RELEASE: New Research Shows Caterers Saved $6 for Every $1 Invested in Reducing Food Waste

For Immediate Release: June 25, 2018 00:01 EST

Contact:

Jillian Holzer, World Resources Institute, jholzer@wri.org, +1 202-729-7754
Jeanet Smids-Goosen, Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality, The Netherlands, j.smids@minlnv.nl
Amanda Williamson, WRAP, amanda.williamson@wrap.org.uk, +44 01295 2366643

WASHINGTON – New research on behalf of Champions 12.3 finds there is a compelling business case for food service operators serving hospitals, schools, sports arenas and other facilities to reduce food waste. The Business Case for Reducing Food Loss and Waste: Catering shows that for every $1 caterers invested in programs to curb food waste, they saved more than $6 in operating costs.

The first-of-its kind industry analysis examined financial cost and benefit data for 86 sites across six countries. Within one year, the sites had reduced food waste by 36 percent on average, and 64 percent had recouped their investment.

These food service operators made a range of investments in food waste reduction programs, including purchasing smart scales or similar technology to measure their food waste, training staff in measurement and techniques to reduce waste, and redesigning menus. A full 79 percent of sites were able to keep their total investment in food waste reduction below $10,000.

The financial returns come from reducing purchase costs by buying less food, increasing revenue from new menu items developed from unsold food or those once considered “scraps,” and reduced waste management costs.

“Taking action across the food industry is vital if we are to halve global food waste by 2030,” said Dave Lewis, Group Chief Executive of Tesco and Chair of Champions 12.3. “As Chair of Champions 12.3, I’m delighted to be able to share today’s report, which clearly shows that reducing food waste in the catering sector isn’t just the right thing to do, it also makes good business sense.”

“We began segregating, weighing and reporting our food waste in early 2014 through our own online accounts portal. We split the waste in to production waste, spoilage waste and plate waste and alongside that ran our in-house Green Flash training modules.  We have seen some fantastic results with more than 40% reduction in waste,” said Mike Hanson, Head of Sustainable Business for BaxterStorey. “The ROI is far reaching and not just financial in terms of cost of food; we have also seen huge savings in waste disposal and energy costs for our clients, our margins have improved and we have seen a massive reduction in carbon and other environmental impacts.”

One-third of all food produced in the world goes uneaten, leading to tremendous economic, social and environmental impacts. Food loss and waste accounts for $940 billion in economic losses and 8 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions annually. At the same time, more than 800 million people are chronically undernourished.

“This report has real-world lessons that can be applied in company kitchens today,” said Liz Goodwin, Senior Fellow and Director, Food Loss and Waste at World Resources Institute. “The catering industry has been a leader in piloting creative solutions for reducing pre-consumer food waste. The task now is to expand the pilots and for those in the industry to learn from what others have seen success doing.  This is critical for companies to realize the financial benefits for themselves and contribute to the global effort to halve food waste.”

“We have made great progress, particularly in the business sector, in building reduction of food waste into their DNA. But there is still a lot of work to do if we are going to reach the UN SDG 12.3 to halve food waste by 2030,” said Marcus Gover, Chief Executive of WRAP. “This report, co-authored by WRAP & WRI, is yet more compelling proof for business that you can provide great customer service, and a great customer experience, while reducing costs and the impact of food waste on the environment.”

The report recommends catering managers take a “target, measure, act” approach to reduce the amount of food wasted from their kitchens. It outlines five actions institutional caterers should take, based on interviews with those who have implemented successful food waste reduction programs: (1) measure the amount of food being wasted to know where to prioritize efforts, (2) engage staff, (3) start small and get creative, (4) reduce overproduction, and (5) re-purpose excess food. By sharing knowledge about what works and expanding its efforts, the industry can play an important role in halving food waste in line with the UN’s Sustainable Development Goal Target 12.3.

For more information, read the full report at https://champions123.org/the-business-case-for-reducing-food-loss-and-waste-caterers/.

This report is follow up from The Business Case for Reducing Food Loss and Waste (published March 2017), and is the second in a series of papers examining the business case for specific industries. An analysis of the hotel industry was released in April 2018, and an analysis on the restaurant industry will be released soon.

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The Business Case for Reducing Food Loss and Waste: Catering was made possible by support from Walmart Foundation and the Ministry of Economic Affairs of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Lead authors were Peter Mitchell (WRAP) and Austin Clowes and Craig Hanson (WRI).

ABOUT CHAMPIONS 12.3

Champions 12.3 is a coalition of nearly 40 leaders across government, business and civil society dedicated to inspiring ambition, mobilizing action, and accelerating progress toward achieving Target 12.3 of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. Target 12.3 calls on the world to “halve per capita global food waste at the retail and consumer levels and reduce food losses along production and supply chains, including post-harvest losses” by 2030.

The Government of the Kingdom of the Netherlands and the World Resources Institute serve as co-secretariats of Champions 12.3.

RELEASE: New Research Finds Hotels Saved $7 for Every $1 Invested in Reducing Food Waste

For Immediate Release: April 5, 2018 00:01 CEST

Contact:

Jillian Holzer, World Resources Institute, jholzer@wri.org, +1 202-729-7754
Kim van Seeters, Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality, The Netherlands, k.vanseeters@minez.nl
Amanda Williamson, WRAP, amanda.williamson@wrap.org.uk, +44 01295 2366643

WASHINGTON – New research on behalf of Champions 12.3 finds there is a compelling business case for hotels to reduce the amount of food they throw away.  For every $1 hotels invested in programs to reduce kitchen food waste, on average they saved $7 in operating costs.

In a first-of-its kind analysis for the industry, The Business Case for Reducing Food Loss and Waste: Hotels evaluated financial cost and benefit data for 42 sites – including Sofitel, MGM and more – across 15 countries, finding that nearly every site realized a positive return on its investment to reduce food waste. Within just one year, the hotels had reduced food waste from their kitchens by 21 percent on average, and over 70 percent had recouped their investment.  Within two years, 95 percent had recouped their investment.

The types of investments hotels made include: measuring and monitoring the amount of food wasted, training staff on new food handling and storage procedures, and redesigning menus. Nearly 90 percent of sites were able to keep their total investment below $20,000, which was less than 1 percent of sales on average. This shows that the cost of change was low and the benefits were high for all businesses assessed.

The 7:1 return on investment comes from buying less food and thereby reducing purchase costs, increasing revenue from new menu items developed from leftovers or foods previously considered “scraps,” and lower waste management costs.

“We need to take action right across the food chain if we’re going to halve food waste by 2030. That means reducing food waste in homes, farms, retail, distribution, and in the hospitality sector,” said Dave Lewis, Group Chief Executive of Tesco and Chair of Champions 12.3. “This report clearly shows that reducing waste in hotels isn’t just the right thing to do. It also makes good business sense. So even if the moral imperative doesn’t move us, the business case for reducing food waste should persuade every CEO.”

“With these figures, I hope more in the industry will see food waste reduction as an opportunity and an important part of the hotel business,” said Lionel Formento, Director of Food and Beverage, Sofitel Bangkok Sukhumvit. “Our customers increasingly care about the environment, and that shift shows no signs of slowing down. Sofitel Bangkok Sukhumvit has prioritized reducing food waste as an important part of our sustainability efforts. From engaging management to our chefs and suppliers, implementing a food waste reduction program has helped us stay innovative and a leader.”

One-third of all food produced in the world is never eaten, which has tremendous economic, social and environmental consequences. Food loss and waste is responsible for $940 billion in economic losses and 8 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions annually. At the same time, some 800 million people do not have enough food to eat.

“Reducing food waste within the hospitality sector provides us with a unique opportunity not only to influence an industry, but to raise awareness with travellers globally. It’s exciting to see foundations, NGOs, and businesses all coming together to solve this issue and recognize food waste’s impact on our planet and biodiversity,” said Yolanda Kakabadse of World Wildlife Fund US’s Board of Directors.

“This report, which WRAP co-authored with WRI, demonstrates the compelling economic case for reducing food waste in hotels. There is a 600 percent return on investment, and over two-thirds of the companies find they get their money back within a year. This is excellent, but if we are to deliver the SDG 12.3 target of halving food waste by 2030, we must build momentum for change in all hotels,” says Marcus Gover, Chief Executive of WRAP. “We have clearly shown that with simple measures, hotels can save money, protect the environment and still satisfy the needs of their customers. By working together we can make this happen more rapidly, all around the world.”

The report recommends hotel owners and managers take a “target, measure, act” approach to reduce the amount of food wasted from their kitchens. It outlines five action steps for hotel managers, based on interviews with those who have implemented successful food waste reduction programs: (1) measure the amount of food being wasted to know where to prioritize efforts, (2) engage staff, (3) re-think the buffet, (4) reduce overproduction, and (5) re-purpose excess food. By working together, businesses may also be able to share new best practices to make an even greater impact and put businesses on a trajectory to halve food waste in line with the UN’s Sustainable Development Goal Target 12.3.

“The Sustainable Development Goals give us clear targets, which we need to achieve in just 13 years. We know that the worldwide food waste challenge is large and urgent. It will not be easy to solve and requires action by all of us,” said Liz Goodwin, Senior Fellow and Director, Food Loss and Waste at World Resources Institute. “This report demonstrates that action by the hotel sector can bring results quickly and that there are real financial benefits to be realized. There is no time to waste and we need more leaders to step up and do their bit, improving their businesses and securing the economic, social and environmental benefits.”

For more information, read the full report at https://champions123.org/the-business-case-for-reducing-food-loss-and-waste-hotels/

This report is follow up from The Business Case for Reducing Food Loss and Waste (published March 2017), and is the first in a series of papers examining the business case for specific industry sectors. Analyses of the catering and restaurant industries will be released later in 2018.

The Business Case for Reducing Food Loss and Waste: Hotels was made possible by support from Walmart Foundation and the Ministry of Economic Affairs of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Lead authors were Peter Mitchell (WRAP) and Austin Clowes and Craig Hanson (WRI).

RELEASE: The Netherlands Announces National Program to Reduce Food Waste

Champions of UN Sustainable Development Goal Target 12.3 Driving Effort Through Innovative Pilots and Public-Private Partnerships

For Immediate Release: March 23, 2018

Contact: Jillian Holzer, World Resources Institute, jholzer@wri.org, +1 202-729-7754
Kim van Seeters, Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality, The Netherlands, k.vanseeters@minez.nl

WASHINGTON (March 23, 2018)– The Netherlands is aiming to be one of the first countries in the world to cut food waste in half, and now the country has a new national program, United Against Food Waste, to put it on a path to success. The initiative was announced Tuesday by the Taskforce Circular Economy in Food, a group made up of companies, research institutes, civil society organizations and the government.

Among the action items announced was a pilot supermarket aisle filled with items made from foods that otherwise would have gone to waste. The store shelf features products like soup created from wonky fruit and vegetables, beer from stale bread, and soaps made from discarded orange peels. Researchers from Wageningen University & Research will monitor and test sales and a host of other data points over the next six months to learn how best to expand the line of items.

The aisle was opened in the George Verberne Jumbo Supermarket in Wageningen by Louise Fresco, President of Wageningen University & Research’s executive board and a member of Champions 12.3, the global coalition of executives committed to halving food loss and waste by 2030.

“It’s very exciting to be able to go into a grocery store and buy items you know are helping to avoid excess waste. It’s equally exciting to see the lessons we can glean about which types of products and packaging appeal to consumers, what pricing level is correct, and how best to market and present the products,” said Fresco. “One-third of all food is lost or wasted in the world, and the social, environmental and economic impacts are enormous. It’s urgent that we find scalable solutions to this challenge.”

The supermarket aisle is one part of the new national program, which will focus on monitoring progress, joining forces to combat food waste across the food supply chain, changing consumer behavior to waste less food, and promoting legislation.

The Netherlands is among the top countries in the world for tackling food loss and waste due to leadership from across its sectors. In addition to Fresco, Dutch members of Champions 12.3 include Hans Hoogeveen, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of the Netherlands to the UN Organizations for Food and Agriculture; Paul Polman, CEO of Unilever; Wiebe Draijer, Chairman of the Managing Board for Rabobank; Feike Sijbesma, CEO and Chairman of the Managing Board for Royal DSM; and Peter Bakker, President and CEO of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development.

“Food loss and waste is an issue that must be prioritized, and it takes committed leaders to do that. We have an obligation to ensure the food that is produced around the world feeds people, and that it doesn’t go unused or end up in landfills. A lot of work remains. Public-private partnerships are vital for building the momentum needed to halve the more than 1 billion tons of food that is lost or wasted from farm to fork each year,” said Hoogeveen.

Representatives from the Rockefeller Foundation, WRAP and World Bank also joined the “Dutch Champions 12.3” event.

Also on Tuesday, at the “Appetite for Action” event, Wiebe Draijer – as head of Rabobank, the world’s leading food and agriculture bank – announced Kickstart Waste, a 3-year program to contribute to the Sustainable Development Goals’ Target 12.3 on food loss and waste.

With Kickstart Waste, Rabobank aims to show how partners, including customers and companies throughout the food chain, can work together worldwide to find solutions to halve food waste by 2030.

“We see the ongoing transition to a sustainable food and agricultural sector not only as a moral imperative, but also as an incredible business opportunity,” said Draijer. “According to the FAO, there is a potential global market of almost a trillion dollars in food waste and food loss alone. We’re seeing an increasing number of clients investing in sustainability measures throughout the food value chain. At the same time, we’re excited about the emerging technologies coming from the start-ups we’re discovering and supporting through our FoodBytes! events and our Terra accelerator program. The need for change has never been greater, and as a result the business opportunities have never been bigger.”

Today, 28 percent of the world’s population lives in a country or regional bloc that has set a specific food loss and waste reduction target aligned with SDG Target 12.3. There has been a burgeoning of country-level public-private partnerships, but much more action is needed worldwide. Champions 12.3 has outlined the business case for countries and companies to reduce food loss and waste – and Champions are actively moving local, national and regional efforts to meet Target 12.3

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ABOUT CHAMPIONS 12.3

Champions 12.3 is a coalition of nearly 40 leaders across government, business and civil society dedicated to inspiring ambition, mobilizing action, and accelerating progress toward achieving Target 12.3 of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. Target 12.3 calls on the world to “halve per capita global food waste at the retail and consumer levels and reduce food losses along production and supply chains, including post-harvest losses” by 2030.

The Government of the Kingdom of the Netherlands and the World Resources Institute serve as co-secretariats of Champions 12.3.
www.Champions123.org

RELEASE: Companies Commit to Simplify Food Date Labels Worldwide by 2020, Reducing Food Waste

The Consumer Goods Forum and Champions 12.3 issue landmark call to use two simple date labels by 2020

For Immediate Release: September 20, 2017

Contact:

Lee Green, The Consumer Goods Forum, +33 182009570,
l.green@theconsumergoodsforum.com
Lauren Zelin, World Resources Institute, +1 202-729-7736, lzelin@wri.org
Jillian Holzer, World Resources Institute, +1 202-729-7754, jholzer@wri.org

NEW YORK (September 20, 2017) — “Sell by,” “Use by,” “Display until,” “Best before,” what do they all mean? Consumers around the world navigate a range of date labels on food products, and the resulting confusion costs families up to $29 billion annually in the United States alone. The Consumer Goods Forum (CGF) – a network of 400 of the biggest consumer goods companies across 70 countries – along with Champions 12.3 has approved a Call to Action to standardize food date labels worldwide by 2020.

The CGF Board of Directors unanimously adopted the Call to Action to simplify date labels, including companies like Tesco, Kellogg, Walmart, Campbell Soup, Bimbo, Pick n Pay, Nestlé, Carrefour and Unilever. The Call to Action says retailers and food producers should take three important steps to simplify date labels and reduce food waste by 2020:

  1. Only one label at a time
  2. Choice of two labels: one expiration date for perishable items (e.g. “Use by”) and one food quality indicator for non-perishable items (e.g., “Best if used by”). The exact wording will be tailored to regional context
  3. Consumer education to better understand what date labels mean

The announcement expands national efforts to streamline date labels in the United States, United Kingdom and Japan to the rest of the world.

In addition to the labels on products, the Call to Action recommends companies partner with nonprofit organizations and government agencies to educate consumers about how to interpret date labels. Education efforts could include in-store displays, web materials and public service announcements. Many consumers don’t know, for example, that many products are still safe to eat past the “Best if used by” date.

“Four years ago, Tesco was one of the first retailers to roll out single date coding across our fresh food and meat produce. All the evidence from WRAP and our own Tesco research has shown that streamlining date codes helps customers waste less food and it also reduces waste in our own operations. That’s why it’s so important we extend this practice to more companies in every country. Streamlining date labels worldwide by 2020 could be game-changing in the fight against global food waste,” said Dave Lewis, Group Chief Executive of Tesco and Chair of Champions 12.3

“Kellogg Company is working to reduce food loss and waste along the production and supply chains, and we want to encourage consumers to be part of the solution too. As a global food company, we work to reduce hunger, improve nutrition and protect the planet,” said Maria Fernanda Mejia, Sr. Vice President of the Kellogg Company and President of Kellogg Latin America. “Simplifying food date labels is an important step forward in preventing food waste, and will help end the confusion related to ‘sell by’ dates. Kellogg is an enthusiastic supporter of improved and harmonized food labeling standards to help educate and empower consumers to prevent food waste, save their families money, and conserve resources to protect our planet.”

“Walmart has worked with its suppliers to support the use of standardized date labels that provide consistent and transparent information to better reflect product’s shelf life,” said Katherine Neebe, Director for Sustainability at Walmart. “I commend CGF for leveraging their influence to support customer-friendly labeling practices.”

An estimated 1.3 billion tons of food worldwide is lost or wasted each year. The average UK household with children spends £700 a year on food that’s thrown away – in the United States, that figure is $1,500. Standardizing food date labels is a simple and effective way to reduce the amount of edible food thrown out by households, saving them money and reducing their environmental footprint. Food loss and waste is a major contributor to climate change, emitting 8 percent of annual greenhouse gases.

“Now more than ever is the time for business to play a leading role in tackling food waste. This is an issue that can only truly be tackled by collaboration across the value chain. Through our global membership, the CGF is committed to playing a leadership role. We believe simplified and consistent date labelling will help us get one step closer to meeting our resolution to halve food waste by 2025 while also helping reduce confusion for consumers,” said Peter Freedman, Managing Director of The Consumer Goods Forum.

Today’s announcement was made at a Champions 12.3 event at The Rockefeller Foundation during Climate Week and the 72nd United Nations General Assembly. This week marks two years since the launch of the Sustainable Development Goals. At the event, Champions 12.3 also launched SDG Target 12.3 on Food Loss and Waste: 2017 Progress Report, which takes stock of global progress to date toward halving food waste and reducing food loss by 2030.

“The Sustainable Development Goals have given us a historic opportunity and we must rise to the challenge,” said Hans Hoogeveen, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of the Netherlands to the UN Organizations for Food and Agriculture. “Of all the SDGs, Target 12.3 is the only one to my knowledge that is being advocated by a coalition like Champions 12.3 with leaders from every sector mobilizing action to achieve success. We stand a great chance, but a lot of work remains.”

The report finds that countries and companies are setting reduction targets aligned with SDG Target 12.3 – today, 28 percent of the world’s population live in a country or region with a target to reduce food loss and waste, and nearly 60 percent of the world’s 50 largest food companies have set reduction targets.

Innovative initiatives are also taking off, especially in the private sector. A growing number of the 50 largest food companies now have active food loss and waste reduction programs. However, the report finds an insufficient number of governments and companies are measuring and reporting food loss and waste, a key step to identifying hotspots and knowing whether strategies are having impact.

“It is good to see clear signs of momentum building behind the movement to tackle food loss and waste and the leadership being demonstrated by individual Champions and others,” said Liz Goodwin, Senior Fellow and Director, Food Loss and Waste at World Resources Institute. “However, 2030 is only 13 years away, and more is needed. We now have a roadmap for how to cut in half the more than 1 billion tons of food that goes uneaten each year, and it’s vital that governments and the private sector everywhere put it to use.”

“The report we co-authored with WRI shows we are moving in the right direction, but we need to build momentum quickly. We need action from everyone from governments, businesses, NGOs and us all in our homes: uniting in the food waste fight,” said Marcus Gover, Chief Executive of WRAP. “It is also essential that developing nations get the financial support they need to tackle food loss and waste. We have gathering impetus, and now we have something which could help navigate us all to our destination. There is no time to lose.”

Read SDG Target 12.3 on Food Loss and Waste: 2017 Progress Report here: https://champions123.org/2017-progress-report/

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ABOUT THE CONSUMER GOODS FORUM

The Consumer Goods Forum (“CGF”) is a global, parity-based industry network that is driven by its members to encourage the global adoption of practices and standards that serves the consumer goods industry worldwide. It brings together the CEOs and senior management of some 400 retailers, manufacturers, service providers, and other stakeholders across 70 countries, and it reflects the diversity of the industry in geography, size, product category and format. Its member companies have combined sales of EUR 3.5 trillion and directly employ nearly 10 million people, with a further 90 million related jobs estimated along the value chain. It is governed by its Board of Directors, which comprises more than 50 manufacturer and retailer CEOs. For more information, please visit: www.theconsumergoodsforum.com.

ABOUT CHAMPIONS 12.3

Champions 12.3 is a coalition of more than three dozen leaders across government, business and civil society dedicated to inspiring ambition, mobilizing action, and accelerating progress toward achieving Target 12.3 of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. Target 12.3 calls on the world to “halve per capita global food waste at the retail and consumer levels and reduce food losses along production and supply chains, including post-harvest losses” by 2030.

The Government of the Kingdom of the Netherlands and the World Resources Institute serve as co-secretariats of Champions 12.3. For more information, visit www.Champions123.org

Champions Include:

Dave Lewis, Group Chief Executive, Tesco (Chair)
Erik Solheim, Executive Director, United Nations Environment (Co-Chair)
Vytenis Andriukaitis, European Commissioner for Health and Food Safety
Peter Bakker, President, World Business Council for Sustainable Development
John Bryant, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Kellogg Company
Paul Bulcke, Chairman of the Board of Directors, Nestlé
Nguyen Xuan Cuong, Minister of  Agriculture and Rural Development, Vietnam
Michael La Cour, Managing Director, IKEA Food Services AB
Wiebe Draijer, Chairman of the Executive Board, Rabobank
Shenggen Fan, Director General, International Food Policy Research Institute
Peter Freedman, Managing Director, The Consumer Goods Forum
Louise Fresco, President of the Executive Board, Wageningen University & Research
Liz Goodwin, Senior Fellow and Director, Food Loss and Waste, World Resources Institute
Marcus Gover, Chief Executive Officer, Waste and Resources Action Programme
Hans Hoogeveen, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of the Netherlands to the UN Organizations for Food and Agriculture
Gilbert Houngbo, President, International Fund for Agricultural Development
Selina Juul, Chairman of the Board and Founder, Stop Wasting Food Movement in Denmark
Yolanda Kakabadse, President, WWF International
Sam Kass, Former White House Chef, Founder of TROVE and Venture Partner, Acre Venture Partners
Michel Landel, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Executive Committee, Sodexo
Esben Lunde Larsen, Minister of Environment and Food, Denmark
José Antonio Meade, Minister of Finance, Mexico
Gina McCarthy, Former Administrator, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Denise Morrison, President and Chief Executive Officer, Campbell Soup Company
Kanayo Nwanze, Former President, International Fund for Agricultural Development
Rafael Pacchiano, Minister of the Environment and Natural Resources, Mexico
Paul Polman, Chief Executive Officer, Unilever
Juan Lucas Restrepo Ibiza, Chairman, Global Forum on Agricultural Research
Judith Rodin, Former President, The Rockefeller Foundation
Oyun Sanjaasuren, Chair, Global Water Partnership
Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Vice President for Country Support, Policy and Delivery, Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa
Feike Sijbesma, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Managing Board, Royal DSM
Rajiv Shah, President, The Rockefeller Foundation
Andrew Steer, President and Chief Executive Officer, World Resources Institute
Achim Steiner, Administrator, United Nations Development Programme
Tristram Stuart, Founder, Feedback
Rhea Suh, President, Natural Resources Defense Council
Rhoda Peace Tumusiime, Former Commissioner for Rural Economy and Agriculture, The African Union
Sunny Verghese, Co-Founder, Group Managing Director & Chief Executive Officer, Olam International
Tom Vilsack, Former Secretary, U.S. Department of Agriculture
Senzeni Zokwana, Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Republic of South Africa

RELEASE: Michael La Cour and Selina Juul Join Champions 12.3, Coalition to Reduce Food Loss and Waste

For Immediate Release: July 12, 2017
Contact: Jillian Holzer, World Resources Institute, jholzer@wri.org, +1 202-729-7754

WASHINGTON (July 12, 2017) Adding to its powerhouse ranks, Champions 12.3 – the coalition of nearly 40 CEOs, ministers and other leaders committed to achieving the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals Target 12.3 on food loss and waste – announces new members Michael La Cour and Selina Juul.

Worldwide more than 1 billion tons of food each year is never consumed, while one in nine people remain undernourished. Food loss and waste amounts to economic losses of $940 billion per year and is responsible for an estimated 8 percent of annual greenhouse gas emissions; if it were a country, food loss and waste would be the third largest emitter after China and the United States.

“I am really pleased that Michael and Selina are joining the Champions 12.3. A key focus of our work as Champions this year is to help drive action in reducing food waste across the whole food chain – in particular, upstream in the catering industry and in peoples’ homes. The expertise that Michael and Selina bring to the group will greatly strengthen the work we’re doing in these areas and support our efforts to meet the UN’s Target 12.3,” said Dave Lewis, Group Chief Executive of Tesco and Chair of Champions 12.3.

Continue reading RELEASE: Michael La Cour and Selina Juul Join Champions 12.3, Coalition to Reduce Food Loss and Waste

Welcome Michael La Cour to Champions 12.3

We’re delighted to announce that Michael La Cour, MD IKEA Food Services AB, has joined Champions 12.3 as a Champion.

Driven by the IKEA vision to create a better everyday life for the many people, Michael La Cour has been leading the development of IKEA Food Services AB for the past years with focus on health and sustainability. The main objectives of this transformation is to move IKEA Food towards a wider offer of delicious, healthy and more sustainable food, easily available and affordable for the many.

Michael has experience from the food retail business prior to joining IKEA, where he has now been working for the past two decades. He started out as a Country Manager at IKEA Indonesia to become a Deputy trading area manager for IKEA in South East Asia. He has been an IKEA Store Manager in the USA and a Business Manager for one of the Business Areas at IKEA of Sweden.

Along with Michael’s decision to join Champions 12.3 as a Champion, IKEA announced today their goal of halving their food waste by the end of their August 2020. See the IKEA Press Release for details.

RELEASE: New Research Finds Companies Saved $14 for Every $1 Invested in Reducing Food Waste

Contact: Jillian Holzer, World Resources Institute, jholzer@wri.org, +1 202-729-7754
Contact: Kim van Seeters, Ministry of Economic Affairs, Directorate General Agriculture and Nature, The Netherlands, k.vanseeters@minez.nl

RELEASE: New Research Finds Companies Saved $14 for Every $1 Invested in Reducing Food Waste  

Report from Champions 12.3 shows that companies, consumers and governments can save billions of dollars and millions of tons of food by acting to cut food loss and waste

WASHINGTON (March 6, 2017)–One-third of all food produced in the world is never eaten, which has tremendous economic, social and environmental consequences. New research on behalf of Champions 12.3 finds that for every $1 companies invested to reduce food loss and waste, they saved $14 in operating costs. The report finds that household savings could be much greater.

In a first-of-its kind analysis, The Business Case for Reducing Food Loss and Waste evaluated financial cost and benefit data for 1,200 sites across 700 companies in 17 countries, finding that nearly every site realized a positive return on its investment to reduce food waste. The types of investments companies made include: quantifying and monitoring food loss and waste, training staff on practices to reduce waste, changing food storage and handling processes, changing packaging to extend shelf-life, changing date labels, and other staff and technology investments.

Continue reading RELEASE: New Research Finds Companies Saved $14 for Every $1 Invested in Reducing Food Waste

Dutch Taskforce Connects Initiatives Against Food Waste

This post originally appeared on the website for Wageningen University & Research. Several Champions are part of the taskforce, including Feike Sijbesma (Royal DSM), Hans Hoogeveen (FAO),  and Louise Fresco (WUR). 

The Taskforce Circular Economy in Food, launched today during the National Food Summit in the Netherlands, aims to prevent and reduce food waste and become an international frontrunner in the valorisation of agrifood residual streams. The Taskforce, an initiative by Wageningen University & Research, in collaboration with the Ministry of Economic Affairs and the Sustainable Food Alliance, connects initiatives against food waste. It is leading the transition towards acceleration and the development of a circular economy. The Taskforce is currently composed of 25 members from the entire food supply chain, from SMEs to food multinationals, and supplemented with members from public and societal organisations.

Continue reading Dutch Taskforce Connects Initiatives Against Food Waste

The Rockefeller Foundation, USDA, and EPA to Lead Creation of National Resource Center for Action Against Food Waste

NEW YORK, Dec. 15, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — Today, The Rockefeller Foundation announced its collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and a partnership of 10 private sector and non-profit organizations to create “Further With Food: Center for Food Loss and Waste Solutions,” an online hub for the exchange of information and solutions that can help realize the national goal of cutting food waste in half by 2030.

Continue reading The Rockefeller Foundation, USDA, and EPA to Lead Creation of National Resource Center for Action Against Food Waste