Five Questions for Danfoss: Reducing Banana Losses in India

This blog is part of the ‘Five Questions’ series, examining examples of how food loss and waste is being reduced around the world.

For this post, we talked with Ravichandran Purushothaman, Danfoss President, India. Danfoss is a part of the Friends of Champions 12.3 network.  

How did your company’s process to address food loss and/or waste get started?

Purushothaman: Danfoss has a long history in refrigeration. Our founder Mads Claus’ first product was an expansion valve for refrigeration systems created in 1933, and he later created the hermetic compressor for refrigerators and freezers in 1952. Refrigeration, and therefore the preservation of food, is at the very heart of Danfoss.

Seven years ago, we started a task force with the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) addressing the challenges around food loss. Realizing that the food supply had major challenges, and that demand for premium food is increasing, the task force sponsored an assessment of the Indian food market, which had not been done before. As a result of its findings, the task force decided to focus on bananas, as the largest produce lost within in the Tamil Nadu region.

Continue reading Five Questions for Danfoss: Reducing Banana Losses in India

RELEASE: New Analysis on Progress Toward Halving Food Loss and Waste

Contact:
Jillian Holzer, World Resources Institute, jholzer@wri.org, +1 202-264-0567
Kim van Seeters, Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality, The Netherlands, k.vanseeters@minez.nl

Sustainable food leaders tracking food loss and waste find that companies are embracing the challenge, announce three big steps toward a 50 percent reduction

NEW YORK (September 25, 2018)—At the United Nations General Assembly in 2015, countries committed to Sustainable Development Goal Target 12.3, calling for the world to cut food loss and waste in half by 2030. Now three years on, a group of sustainable food champions from around the world are tracking progress toward this fast-approaching target – and finding that the private sector has seized the opportunity to tackle food loss and waste.

The new Champions 12.3 Progress Report shows that companies are embracing food loss and waste reductions consistent with SDG Target 12.3, with nearly two-thirds of the world’s 50 largest food companies now participating in programs with a food loss and waste reduction target. The report also finds increasing evidence that companies and countries are measuring their loss and waste and publishing their results, and acting to put new policies and programs in place.

SDG Target 12.3 on Food Loss and Waste: 2018 Progress Report was launched alongside three major announcements from governments and businesses pioneering new efforts to target, measure, and act.

“In a world where one in nine people go hungry, it is a tragedy that a third of all food is lost or wasted. Today’s Champions 12.3 report highlights that great progress has been made but we need more countries and companies to step up,” said Dave Lewis, Chair of Champions 12.3 and Group Chief Executive of Tesco.

The series of announcements from leaders who are part of the Champions 12.3 coalition were made at the start of the 73rd session of the UN General Assembly in New York, and include:

  • Target: Leading Food Brands Embrace Targets and Transparency to Reduce Food Waste

    Lewis announced that 10 of the world’s largest food brands – including Mars, Unilever and General Mills — have not only set targets to halve their food waste by 2030, but also committed to publish the food waste data for their operations within the next 12 months, and take concrete steps to reduce food waste in the supply chain and in customers’ homes. Of the 10 brands, six have made this commitment for their global operations and four for their European or UK businesses. In addition, 27 of Tesco’s largest suppliers, responsible for over half of the retailer’s own label fresh food sales in the UK have now published their food loss and waste data.

    “Publishing food waste data helps us to take targeted action to tackle the problem together from farm to fork,” added Lewis.

  • Measure: New Online Site Brings Global Food Loss and Waste Data to Fingertips

    In a major advancement for food loss and waste data, Marcus Gover, Chief Executive of WRAP, announced the Food Waste Atlas. The Atlas simplifies finding quantified data that companies and governments can use when measuring their food loss and waste. Food loss and waste data by food type, geography, or stage in the supply chain can now be found in one place. It also enables companies and governments to post their completed inventories in congruence with the “Food Loss and Waste Accounting and Reporting Standard.”

    Developed by WRAP and World Resources Institute, and with financial backing from the Walmart Foundation, the Food Waste Atlas already contains data from all parts of the supply chain and from over 190 countries. Its supporters include UN Environment, World Business Council for Sustainable Development, and Wageningen University & Research Centre. “I am delighted to share the Food Waste Atlas with Champions 12.3 today,” said Gover. “Atlas is a hugely important tool to find and report data on food loss and waste to help companies and governments benchmark action globally. Closer to home, we are also unveiling the first Food Waste Reduction Roadmap. This is a UK-wide commitment by all major retailers and more than 50 large food businesses to ‘Target, Measure, Act’ and deliver their part in achieving SDG 12.3. Working with the IGD, WRAP has set out the key milestones UK businesses must reach, and together with Atlas the Roadmap will be an important part of the mechanism to help us all win the food waste fight.”

  • Act: Africa Launches First Strategy to Halve Post-Harvest Losses

    Ambassador Josefa Sacko, the African Union Commissioner for Rural Economy and Agriculture, announced “The Continental Post Harvest Loss Management Strategy.” The Strategy details a suite of innovations in policies, technology, market infrastructure, capacity building, and investment needed to achieve a target for halving post-harvest losses in Africa by 2025. As the first-ever post-harvest loss strategy for the continent, it is a landmark for Africa and the Union’s 55 member states. “For grains alone, the value of post-harvest losses in Africa are estimated to equal $4 billion per year, an amount that could help feed 48 million people,” said Sacko. “Tackling food loss is critical to Africa. Hence it is time for us to take action, and our new strategy is the foundation for that action.”

“The African Union’s new strategy clearly links reducing farm losses with reducing hunger. With joint efforts of private and public sectors in co-managed innovative partnerships we need to massively invest in zero food losses, and also support farmers’ in building sustainable livelihoods, which can have ripple effects for generations to come,” said Hans Hoogeveen, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of the Netherlands to the UN Organizations for Food and Agriculture.

The report finds that an estimated 30 percent of the world’s population now lives in a country or regional bloc with a specific food loss and waste reduction target. These include the African Union, European Union, Australia, Japan, and the United States. Few countries have started measuring their food loss and waste, but the number of national-level initiatives to tackle food loss and waste continues to grow. The United Kingdom, United States, Denmark and the Netherlands are emerging as world leaders setting an example for other nations.

“In the coming year, the world needs to increase its financial investment in reducing the amount of food in Africa and Asia that is lost before hitting the market. At the other end of the food chain, governments and companies should focus on helping reduce consumer and household-level waste. If we can tackle both ends of the food chain, we stand a great chance of halving food loss and waste by 2030,” said Liz Goodwin, Senior Fellow and Director, Food Loss and Waste at World Resources Institute.

Read SDG Target 12:3 on Food Loss and Waste: 2018 Progress Report here: https://champions123.org/2018-progress-report

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FACTS ABOUT FOOD LOSS AND WASTE

  • The number of people facing chronic food deprivation rose to nearly 821 million in 2017, compared to around 804 million in 2016 (FAO).
  • One-third of the world’s food is lost or wasted, totaling more than a billion tons annually (FAO).
  • Food that is harvested but ultimately lost or wasted consumes about one-quarter of all water used by agriculture each year (Kummu et al.). It requires land area greater than the size of China to be grown (FAO). And it generates about 8 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions annually (FAO).
  • Food loss and waste results in roughly $940 billion in economic losses globally per year (FAO).
  • A family of four in the United States wastes an average of $1,500 per year on food they do not consume. That figure is about £700 per year for the average household with children in the United Kingdom (Buzby et al. 2014; WRAP 2015).

ABOUT CHAMPIONS 12.3

Champions 12.3 is a coalition of more than 40 leaders across government, business and civil society dedicated to inspiring ambition, mobilizing action, and accelerating progress toward achieving Target 12.3 of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. Target 12.3 calls on the world to “halve per capita global food waste at the retail and consumer levels and reduce food losses along production and supply chains, including post-harvest losses” by 2030.

The Government of the Kingdom of the Netherlands and the World Resources Institute serve as co-secretariats of Champions 12.3. For more information, visit www.Champions123.org

RELEASE: New Research Shows Caterers Saved $6 for Every $1 Invested in Reducing Food Waste

For Immediate Release: June 25, 2018 00:01 EST

Contact:

Jillian Holzer, World Resources Institute, jholzer@wri.org, +1 202-729-7754
Jeanet Smids-Goosen, Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality, The Netherlands, j.smids@minlnv.nl
Amanda Williamson, WRAP, amanda.williamson@wrap.org.uk, +44 01295 2366643

WASHINGTON – New research on behalf of Champions 12.3 finds there is a compelling business case for food service operators serving hospitals, schools, sports arenas and other facilities to reduce food waste. The Business Case for Reducing Food Loss and Waste: Catering shows that for every $1 caterers invested in programs to curb food waste, they saved more than $6 in operating costs.

The first-of-its kind industry analysis examined financial cost and benefit data for 86 sites across six countries. Within one year, the sites had reduced food waste by 36 percent on average, and 64 percent had recouped their investment.

These food service operators made a range of investments in food waste reduction programs, including purchasing smart scales or similar technology to measure their food waste, training staff in measurement and techniques to reduce waste, and redesigning menus. A full 79 percent of sites were able to keep their total investment in food waste reduction below $10,000.

The financial returns come from reducing purchase costs by buying less food, increasing revenue from new menu items developed from unsold food or those once considered “scraps,” and reduced waste management costs.

“Taking action across the food industry is vital if we are to halve global food waste by 2030,” said Dave Lewis, Group Chief Executive of Tesco and Chair of Champions 12.3. “As Chair of Champions 12.3, I’m delighted to be able to share today’s report, which clearly shows that reducing food waste in the catering sector isn’t just the right thing to do, it also makes good business sense.”

“We began segregating, weighing and reporting our food waste in early 2014 through our own online accounts portal. We split the waste in to production waste, spoilage waste and plate waste and alongside that ran our in-house Green Flash training modules.  We have seen some fantastic results with more than 40% reduction in waste,” said Mike Hanson, Head of Sustainable Business for BaxterStorey. “The ROI is far reaching and not just financial in terms of cost of food; we have also seen huge savings in waste disposal and energy costs for our clients, our margins have improved and we have seen a massive reduction in carbon and other environmental impacts.”

One-third of all food produced in the world goes uneaten, leading to tremendous economic, social and environmental impacts. Food loss and waste accounts for $940 billion in economic losses and 8 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions annually. At the same time, more than 800 million people are chronically undernourished.

“This report has real-world lessons that can be applied in company kitchens today,” said Liz Goodwin, Senior Fellow and Director, Food Loss and Waste at World Resources Institute. “The catering industry has been a leader in piloting creative solutions for reducing pre-consumer food waste. The task now is to expand the pilots and for those in the industry to learn from what others have seen success doing.  This is critical for companies to realize the financial benefits for themselves and contribute to the global effort to halve food waste.”

“We have made great progress, particularly in the business sector, in building reduction of food waste into their DNA. But there is still a lot of work to do if we are going to reach the UN SDG 12.3 to halve food waste by 2030,” said Marcus Gover, Chief Executive of WRAP. “This report, co-authored by WRAP & WRI, is yet more compelling proof for business that you can provide great customer service, and a great customer experience, while reducing costs and the impact of food waste on the environment.”

The report recommends catering managers take a “target, measure, act” approach to reduce the amount of food wasted from their kitchens. It outlines five actions institutional caterers should take, based on interviews with those who have implemented successful food waste reduction programs: (1) measure the amount of food being wasted to know where to prioritize efforts, (2) engage staff, (3) start small and get creative, (4) reduce overproduction, and (5) re-purpose excess food. By sharing knowledge about what works and expanding its efforts, the industry can play an important role in halving food waste in line with the UN’s Sustainable Development Goal Target 12.3.

For more information, read the full report at https://champions123.org/the-business-case-for-reducing-food-loss-and-waste-caterers/.

This report is follow up from The Business Case for Reducing Food Loss and Waste (published March 2017), and is the second in a series of papers examining the business case for specific industries. An analysis of the hotel industry was released in April 2018, and an analysis on the restaurant industry will be released soon.

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The Business Case for Reducing Food Loss and Waste: Catering was made possible by support from Walmart Foundation and the Ministry of Economic Affairs of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Lead authors were Peter Mitchell (WRAP) and Austin Clowes and Craig Hanson (WRI).

ABOUT CHAMPIONS 12.3

Champions 12.3 is a coalition of nearly 40 leaders across government, business and civil society dedicated to inspiring ambition, mobilizing action, and accelerating progress toward achieving Target 12.3 of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. Target 12.3 calls on the world to “halve per capita global food waste at the retail and consumer levels and reduce food losses along production and supply chains, including post-harvest losses” by 2030.

The Government of the Kingdom of the Netherlands and the World Resources Institute serve as co-secretariats of Champions 12.3.

RELEASE: New Research Finds Hotels Saved $7 for Every $1 Invested in Reducing Food Waste

For Immediate Release: April 5, 2018 00:01 CEST

Contact:

Jillian Holzer, World Resources Institute, jholzer@wri.org, +1 202-729-7754
Kim van Seeters, Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality, The Netherlands, k.vanseeters@minez.nl
Amanda Williamson, WRAP, amanda.williamson@wrap.org.uk, +44 01295 2366643

WASHINGTON – New research on behalf of Champions 12.3 finds there is a compelling business case for hotels to reduce the amount of food they throw away.  For every $1 hotels invested in programs to reduce kitchen food waste, on average they saved $7 in operating costs.

In a first-of-its kind analysis for the industry, The Business Case for Reducing Food Loss and Waste: Hotels evaluated financial cost and benefit data for 42 sites – including Sofitel, MGM and more – across 15 countries, finding that nearly every site realized a positive return on its investment to reduce food waste. Within just one year, the hotels had reduced food waste from their kitchens by 21 percent on average, and over 70 percent had recouped their investment.  Within two years, 95 percent had recouped their investment.

The types of investments hotels made include: measuring and monitoring the amount of food wasted, training staff on new food handling and storage procedures, and redesigning menus. Nearly 90 percent of sites were able to keep their total investment below $20,000, which was less than 1 percent of sales on average. This shows that the cost of change was low and the benefits were high for all businesses assessed.

The 7:1 return on investment comes from buying less food and thereby reducing purchase costs, increasing revenue from new menu items developed from leftovers or foods previously considered “scraps,” and lower waste management costs.

“We need to take action right across the food chain if we’re going to halve food waste by 2030. That means reducing food waste in homes, farms, retail, distribution, and in the hospitality sector,” said Dave Lewis, Group Chief Executive of Tesco and Chair of Champions 12.3. “This report clearly shows that reducing waste in hotels isn’t just the right thing to do. It also makes good business sense. So even if the moral imperative doesn’t move us, the business case for reducing food waste should persuade every CEO.”

“With these figures, I hope more in the industry will see food waste reduction as an opportunity and an important part of the hotel business,” said Lionel Formento, Director of Food and Beverage, Sofitel Bangkok Sukhumvit. “Our customers increasingly care about the environment, and that shift shows no signs of slowing down. Sofitel Bangkok Sukhumvit has prioritized reducing food waste as an important part of our sustainability efforts. From engaging management to our chefs and suppliers, implementing a food waste reduction program has helped us stay innovative and a leader.”

One-third of all food produced in the world is never eaten, which has tremendous economic, social and environmental consequences. Food loss and waste is responsible for $940 billion in economic losses and 8 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions annually. At the same time, some 800 million people do not have enough food to eat.

“Reducing food waste within the hospitality sector provides us with a unique opportunity not only to influence an industry, but to raise awareness with travellers globally. It’s exciting to see foundations, NGOs, and businesses all coming together to solve this issue and recognize food waste’s impact on our planet and biodiversity,” said Yolanda Kakabadse of World Wildlife Fund US’s Board of Directors.

“This report, which WRAP co-authored with WRI, demonstrates the compelling economic case for reducing food waste in hotels. There is a 600 percent return on investment, and over two-thirds of the companies find they get their money back within a year. This is excellent, but if we are to deliver the SDG 12.3 target of halving food waste by 2030, we must build momentum for change in all hotels,” says Marcus Gover, Chief Executive of WRAP. “We have clearly shown that with simple measures, hotels can save money, protect the environment and still satisfy the needs of their customers. By working together we can make this happen more rapidly, all around the world.”

The report recommends hotel owners and managers take a “target, measure, act” approach to reduce the amount of food wasted from their kitchens. It outlines five action steps for hotel managers, based on interviews with those who have implemented successful food waste reduction programs: (1) measure the amount of food being wasted to know where to prioritize efforts, (2) engage staff, (3) re-think the buffet, (4) reduce overproduction, and (5) re-purpose excess food. By working together, businesses may also be able to share new best practices to make an even greater impact and put businesses on a trajectory to halve food waste in line with the UN’s Sustainable Development Goal Target 12.3.

“The Sustainable Development Goals give us clear targets, which we need to achieve in just 13 years. We know that the worldwide food waste challenge is large and urgent. It will not be easy to solve and requires action by all of us,” said Liz Goodwin, Senior Fellow and Director, Food Loss and Waste at World Resources Institute. “This report demonstrates that action by the hotel sector can bring results quickly and that there are real financial benefits to be realized. There is no time to waste and we need more leaders to step up and do their bit, improving their businesses and securing the economic, social and environmental benefits.”

For more information, read the full report at https://champions123.org/the-business-case-for-reducing-food-loss-and-waste-hotels/

This report is follow up from The Business Case for Reducing Food Loss and Waste (published March 2017), and is the first in a series of papers examining the business case for specific industry sectors. Analyses of the catering and restaurant industries will be released later in 2018.

The Business Case for Reducing Food Loss and Waste: Hotels was made possible by support from Walmart Foundation and the Ministry of Economic Affairs of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Lead authors were Peter Mitchell (WRAP) and Austin Clowes and Craig Hanson (WRI).

Champions 12.3 at 72nd UN General Assembly (September 2017)

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Champions 12.3 hosted a major event September 20, 2017 at The Rockefeller Foundation’s New York office that assessed global progress toward SDG Target 12.3 on food loss and waste, announced landmark developments and set forth a pathway to cutting in half the more than 1 billion tons of food that goes uneaten each year. This event coincided with the 72nd UN General Assembly and Climate Week.

Speakers

  • Dave LewisGroup Chief Executive, Tesco and Chair, Champions 12.3
  • Rajiv Shah (@rajshah), President, The Rockefeller Foundation
  • Esben Lunde LarsenMinister for Food and Environment, Denmark
  • Hans HoogeveenAmbassador and Permanent Representative of the Netherlands to the UN Organizations for Food and Agriculture
  • Michael La Cour (@MichaelIKEAFood), Managing Director, IKEA Food Services AB
  • Liz Goodwin (@LizGoodwin), Senior Fellow and Director, Food Loss and Waste, World Resources Institute
  • Shenggen FanDirector General, International Food Policy Research Institute
  • Rafael FlorDirector, YieldWise, The Rockefeller Foundation
  • Yolanda Kakabadse (@WWF_President), President, WWF International
  • Sam Kass (@chefsamkass), Former White House Chef, Founder of TROVE and Venture Partner, Acre Venture Partners
  • Lorna DonatoneCEO, Geographic Regions and Region Chair for North America, Sodexo
  • Maria Fernanda MejiaPresident, Kellogg Latin America
  • Peter WhiteVice President and Chief Operating Officer, World Business Council for Sustainable Development

Among the event’s announcements:

The Global Agri-business Alliance announced a Food Loss Resolution to halve member companies’ food and agricultural losses by 2030, and to work with suppliers to the same end. The Resolution, coupled with The Consumer Goods Forum’s “Food Waste Resolution” from 2015, means that major companies covering the entire food supply chain – from farm to fork –  for the first time ever have set explicit commitments to achieving Target 12.3. Read more here:  Global Agri-business Alliance adopts Food Loss Resolution

The Consumer Goods Forum and Champions 12.3 issued a Call-to-Action to retailers and food producers to simplify date labels and reduce food waste by 2020.
The Call-to-Action says retailers and food producers should take three important steps to simplify date labels and reduce food waste by 2020:

  • Only one label at a time
  • Choice of two labels: one expiration date for perishable items (e.g. “Use by”) and one food quality indicator for non-perishable items (e.g., “Best if used by”). The exact wording will be tailored to regional context 
  • Consumer education to better understand what date labels mean

The announcement expands national efforts to streamline date labels in the United States, United Kingdom and Japan to the rest of the world. In addition to the labels on products, the Call to Action recommends companies partner with nonprofit  organizations and government agencies to educate consumers about how to interpret date labels. Education efforts could include in-store displays, web materials and public service announcements. Read more here: The Consumer Goods Forum issues ‘Call to Action’ to Standardize date labels by 2020

Tesco announced partnership agreements with 24 of its largest food suppliers to publish food loss and waste data for their own operations within 12 months and to take steps to reduce food loss and waste in their supply chain.  In addition, Tesco announced that its businesses in the Republic of Ireland, Poland, Slovakia, Czech Republic and Hungary have published their food waste data. Read more here: Tesco Suppliers Join Forces to Tackle Global Food Waste

Champions 12.3 launched its 2017 Progress Report assessing global progress toward achieving Target 12.3, and a roadmap for how to halve food loss and waste by 2030. Read the progress report here and the roadmap here.

Watch video of the event:

Photos

 

View photos from this event on Flickr here »

Clock Ticking on Food Waste

By Dave Lewis, Group Chief Executive of Tesco and Chair of Champions 12.3

This post originally appeared on Huffington Post on September 20. 

This week, leaders from around the world will gather in New York for the UN General Assembly. Climate change, conflict, and poverty will all crowd the agenda. But one issue on many people’s radar is food waste. It might not grab the headlines, but the need to tackle it is urgent and compelling.

Continue reading Clock Ticking on Food Waste

RELEASE: Michael La Cour and Selina Juul Join Champions 12.3, Coalition to Reduce Food Loss and Waste

For Immediate Release: July 12, 2017
Contact: Jillian Holzer, World Resources Institute, jholzer@wri.org, +1 202-729-7754

WASHINGTON (July 12, 2017) Adding to its powerhouse ranks, Champions 12.3 – the coalition of nearly 40 CEOs, ministers and other leaders committed to achieving the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals Target 12.3 on food loss and waste – announces new members Michael La Cour and Selina Juul.

Worldwide more than 1 billion tons of food each year is never consumed, while one in nine people remain undernourished. Food loss and waste amounts to economic losses of $940 billion per year and is responsible for an estimated 8 percent of annual greenhouse gas emissions; if it were a country, food loss and waste would be the third largest emitter after China and the United States.

“I am really pleased that Michael and Selina are joining the Champions 12.3. A key focus of our work as Champions this year is to help drive action in reducing food waste across the whole food chain – in particular, upstream in the catering industry and in peoples’ homes. The expertise that Michael and Selina bring to the group will greatly strengthen the work we’re doing in these areas and support our efforts to meet the UN’s Target 12.3,” said Dave Lewis, Group Chief Executive of Tesco and Chair of Champions 12.3.

Continue reading RELEASE: Michael La Cour and Selina Juul Join Champions 12.3, Coalition to Reduce Food Loss and Waste

Welcome Michael La Cour to Champions 12.3

We’re delighted to announce that Michael La Cour, MD IKEA Food Services AB, has joined Champions 12.3 as a Champion.

Driven by the IKEA vision to create a better everyday life for the many people, Michael La Cour has been leading the development of IKEA Food Services AB for the past years with focus on health and sustainability. The main objectives of this transformation is to move IKEA Food towards a wider offer of delicious, healthy and more sustainable food, easily available and affordable for the many.

Michael has experience from the food retail business prior to joining IKEA, where he has now been working for the past two decades. He started out as a Country Manager at IKEA Indonesia to become a Deputy trading area manager for IKEA in South East Asia. He has been an IKEA Store Manager in the USA and a Business Manager for one of the Business Areas at IKEA of Sweden.

Along with Michael’s decision to join Champions 12.3 as a Champion, IKEA announced today their goal of halving their food waste by the end of their August 2020. See the IKEA Press Release for details.

Food waste: how governments, financiers and consumers can play their part

This op-ed first appeared in Thomson Reuters on March 23. 

A recent report from the Champions 12.3 coalition underscores the fact that the global community is capable of tackling the long-running issue of food loss and wastage if all players in the food ‘supply chain’ take action. The challenges are well defined, the incentives are many. But are we doing what is necessary?

Continue reading Food waste: how governments, financiers and consumers can play their part

Tackling food waste: Something politicians can agree on

This op-ed first appeared in The Hill on March 10. 

By Liz Goodwin

From my vantage point in a village in the English countryside, party politics in America are certainly eye-catching. The question for any leader looking to break a stalemate is, what areas of common ground can be found? To my mind, there’s a really clear option.

One would hardly call politics in the United Kingdom tame, and yet one area where our government has found agreement and seen real results is reducing food waste. Nearly 10 years ago, few people in the UK (or elsewhere for that matter) were focusing on food waste as a critical social, economic or environmental issue. Myself and my colleagues at the nonprofit organization WRAP recognized that the amount of food households, restaurants, grocers and others were throwing out was probably sizeable. So, in 2007 we began measuring what edible food was being needlessly thrown away. 

Continue reading Tackling food waste: Something politicians can agree on